Exposing the source: 13 pieces of classic software whose code is now accessible

itworld360:

The source code behind proprietary software doesn’t always remain hidden forever. Here are a baker’s dozen examples where the code behind well-known applications has come to light

Hackathon team’s GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

computermagazinecom:

Hackathon team’s GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple’s personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature of the phone owner’s Nest thermostat or playing a song of choice on the Spotify playlist, or turning on the lights, or unlocking a car. Their efforts have not been ignored by numerous…

View On WordPress

xaqly:


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Two of my favorite things about Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is that it has, to my knowledge, the most emphatic computer in film history. It also shows the dangers of man trying to humanize technology; relying on a computer to control his daily life.  The viewer is led to believe that this supercomputing “brain” of the Discovery One spaceship has a nervous breakdown and is responsible for the murderous rampage on its survey team, and cheer at the sole survival of the ship’s mission commander, who supersedes HAL by shutting down his higher cognitive functions while ignoring his pleas for life and outcries of “temporary insanity”. Then you learn in Peter Hyams’ 2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984) that HAL “went mad” due to an inevitable programming conflict and perhaps acted logically and rationally to befit a machine of his intelligence in such a situation.

xaqly:

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Two of my favorite things about Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is that it has, to my knowledge, the most emphatic computer in film history. It also shows the dangers of man trying to humanize technology; relying on a computer to control his daily life.

The viewer is led to believe that this supercomputing “brain” of the Discovery One spaceship has a nervous breakdown and is responsible for the murderous rampage on its survey team, and cheer at the sole survival of the ship’s mission commander, who supersedes HAL by shutting down his higher cognitive functions while ignoring his pleas for life and outcries of “temporary insanity”.

Then you learn in Peter Hyams’ 2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984) that HAL “went mad” due to an inevitable programming conflict and perhaps acted logically and rationally to befit a machine of his intelligence in such a situation.

gearjock:

My buddy - so sexy. 

gearjock.tumblr.com

gearjock:

My buddy - so sexy.

gearjock.tumblr.com